Celebrating 90 years since Robert Goddard’s rocket launch – @NASA #space

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NASA is celebrating 90 years since Robert Goddard’s rocket lifted off, launching the era of spaceflight.

Ninety years ago, on March 16, 1926, a rocket lifted off – not with a bang, but with a subtle, quiet flame – and forever changed the scope of scientific exploration. This event ties directly to the birth of NASA more than 30 years later.

None of this would be possible without the experiments of Massachusetts physics professor Robert Goddard, best known for inventing the liquid-fueled rocket. The namesake of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, he dreamed as early as 1909 of creating an interplanetary vehicle. While he couldn’t achieve that in his lifetime, his inventions in the first half of the 20th century became the engineering foundation for the rockets that first took humans to the moon in the 1960s and for today’s rockets, which look further into space than ever before.

 

After nearly 17 years of work, Goddard successfully launched his creation on March 16, 1926.

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CONGRATS! @blueorigin lands rocket returning from space! #science

Blue Origin’s New Shepard space vehicle successfully flew to space, reaching its planned test altitude of 329,839 feet (100.5 kilometers) before executing a historic landing back at the launch site in West Texas.

@NASA’s Space Launch System – no small steps! #Journeytomars

No Small Steps Episode 1: Getting to Mars

NASA’s new rocket, the Space Launch System, will meet the challenges of exploring deep space. And when it comes to NASA’s journey of Mars and beyond, there are no small steps. Stephen Granade talks how SLS will be the most capable rocket ever built for that trip to the Red Planet and other destinations in the solar system. This is the first video in a set of three.

Successful launch pad abort test for @NASA and @SpaceX Dragon crew capsule!! with video!!

Crew Dragon’s first critical flight test, known as a Pad Abort Test, is expected to take place on Wednesday, May 6, from SpaceX’s Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) in Cape Canaveral, Florida. While the test is originating from the same launch pad we use for operational missions, this is not an operational flight. This will be the first flight test of SpaceX’s revolutionary new launch abort system, and the odds of encountering delays or issues are high. Fortunately the test doesn’t need to be perfect to be valuable—our primary objective is to capture as much data as possible as the data captured here will be key in preparing Crew Dragon for its first human missions in 2017. More information about the test can be found at: http://www.spacex.com/news/2015/05/04…

[tweet https://twitter.com/NASA/status/595938945839538177] [tweet https://twitter.com/NASA/status/595933904651079681]

Full video of @SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket landing attempt – with explosion!! #SoClose!!!

Amazing video of the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket attempting to land on the drone ship Just Read the Instructions. The rocket essentially lands on the ship correctly, but is off enough to tip over, resulting in a terrific ) explosion. Not bad for a second try!! See the close landing and explosion from the first attempt here. I bet the third time is a charm!!

CRS-6 First Stage Landing

First images of @SpaceX rocket landing attempt on drone ship from today’s Falcon launch!!

[tweet https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/588076749562318849] [tweet https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/588082574183903232] [tweet https://twitter.com/SpaceX/status/588082616890449920]