Today’s APOD is the 1977 video “Powers Of Ten” – the universe from different scales of magnitude!! #science

Today’s Astronomy Picture of the Day is more than a picture… actually a video!!! “How different does the universe look on small, medium, and large scales?”

Powers of Ten takes us on an adventure in magnitudes. Starting at a picnic by the lakeside in Chicago, this famous film transports us to the outer edges of the universe. Every ten seconds we view the starting point from ten times farther out until our own galaxy is visible only a s a speck of light among many others. Returning to Earth with breathtaking speed, we move inward- into the hand of the sleeping picnicker- with ten times more magnification every ten seconds. Our journey ends inside a proton of a carbon atom within a DNA molecule in a white blood cell. POWERS OF TEN © 1977 EAMES OFFICE LLC (Available at http://www.eamesoffice.com)

Beautiful vine from ISS shows aurora and winter wonderland!!

[tweet https://twitter.com/Space_Station/status/575025260917030912]

Today’s favorite tweets! Picture of NYC from space and Onion article about sorting trash into oceans!

[tweet https://twitter.com/TheOnion/status/567483612996440065] [tweet https://twitter.com/Space_Station/status/567403744413749248]

Astronomy pic of the day – Jupiter close-up with 3 moons!!

Jupiter Triple-Moon Conjunction 
Image Credit: NASAESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

Courtesy of the Astronomy Picture of the Day. Hit the link for more info on the picture and also labels for the 3 moons and their shadows!!

Explanation: Our solar system’s ruling giant planet Jupiter and 3 of its 4 large Galilean moons are captured in this single Hubble snapshot from January 24. Crossing in front of Jupiter’s banded cloud tops Europa, Callisto, and Io are framed from lower left to upper right in a rare triple-moon conjunction. Distinguishable by colors alone icy Europa is almost white, Callisto’s ancient cratered surface looks dark brown, and volcanic Io appears yellowish. The transiting moons and moon shadows can be identified by sliding your cursor over the image, or following this link. Remarkably, two small, inner Jovian moons, Amalthea and Thebe, along with their shadows, can also be found in the sharp Hubble view. The Galilean moons have diameters of 3,000 to 5,000 kilometers or so, comparable in size to Earth’s moon. But odd-shaped Amalthea and Thebe are only about 260 and 100 kilometers across respectively.

@NASANewHorizons spacecraft snaps first pictures of Pluto and its largest moon!!!!

[tweet https://twitter.com/NASA/status/563084762240540676]

Lots more info on the New Horizons spacecraft at the NASA website here and here!!!

NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft returned its first new images of Pluto on Wednesday, as the probe closes in on the dwarf planet. Although still just a dot along with its largest moon, Charon, the images come on the 109th birthday of Clyde Tombaugh, who discovered the distant icy world in 1930.

November 7th CauseScience Friday! #science

psgurel – I’ve spent most of this week turning in my thesis and preparing for my defense next week. But today, I’m taking a break from all of that and repeating an experiment!  Oftentimes, we must repeat experiments to prove that we are confident in our results.  While it may not be thrilling to do the same experiment again, it is awesome when a result is reproducible! Today, I’m doing a similar kinetic experiment as I did on Sept 19th. Woohoo!

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crestwind24 – Today one of the graduate students in my lab is defending her PhD. I love going to PhD talks, it is always fun and interesting to see the story that has developed with the training of a new scientist!! Last night and this morning I spent a bunch of time baking a cake for her in the form of a C. elegans. It is a chocolate cake with cream cheese pudding frosting! The green dots and lines represent the two neurons that she has studied in her thesis! Good Luck and Congrats to Dr. Pat!!

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Past CauseScience Friday posts! 

October 31st CauseScience Friday! Happy Halloween! #selfie #science

Happy Halloween!!!! Here at CauseScience we take Halloween very seriously. In fact, we are both traveling to Washington DC today for our annual Halloween get together with friends. Every year for awhile now we have picked a group costume… and rocked it! Although it is not really science-y at all, here are a few pictures of us from the last 3 years (#selfie… sort of).

Last year we did Peter Pan – CauseScience as Tiger Lily and Michael Darling!

peterSesame Street… and apparently dancing Gangnam Style… CauseScience as Ernie and the Count!

sesameAnd lastly, Austin Powers with CauseScience as Vanessa Kensington and Frau Farbissina!

austinpowTune in Tonight or tomorrow for pictures from this years costumes… what will they be???