Author and Neurologist Oliver Sacks died yesterday morning at 82 – Rest in Peace

A sad day for neuroscientists everywhere. Rest In Peace Oliver Sacks! Read the New York Times article summarizing Dr. Sacks impressive life here!

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The New York Times also published a moving article by Oliver Sacks about his dwindling health, read the moving piece here.

And now, weak, short of breath, my once-firm muscles melted away by cancer, I find my thoughts, increasingly, not on the supernatural or spiritual, but on what is meant by living a good and worthwhile life — achieving a sense of peace within oneself. I find my thoughts drifting to the Sabbath, the day of rest, the seventh day of the week, and perhaps the seventh day of one’s life as well, when one can feel that one’s work is done, and one may, in good conscience, rest.

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Oliver Sacks – The Man Who Turned Life Into Magic – @MGleiser @npr13point7

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Be sure to read this beautiful piece by Marcelo Gleiser praising the work of neurologist, writer, and chemist Oliver Sacks (The Man Who Turned Life Into Magic), who recently revealed in the New York Times that he has terminal cancer. I have had the pleasure of reading a number of Sacks’ books and seeing him give a terrific talk in Philadelphia a few years ago. Oliver Sacks is among the strongest of my inspirations for studying the brain!!

Oliver Sacks is a rare soul-reader among us, a golden heart that beats in resonance with an enlightened intellect and a refinement of feeling that finds the humanity cloistered in the deepest recesses of a damaged life. The stories he tells are the stories of his patients, but also his own; he knows and tells us, beautifully, how each experience touches and transforms his own, how each tale he narrates becomes part of his own narrative, his own life story. In this, and in writings such as Uncle Tungsten or Altered States, his New Yorker essay on hallucinatory drugs, we learn that to Oliver life is a grand experiment of the human condition, an experiment that can only bear fruit if we have the courage to engage fully with it. Oliver is the bravest man I know.