Remember the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge? Wonder where the $$$ went?? #TBT

Around this time last year, all of your news and social media feeds were probably covered with people doing or talking about the ALS ice bucket challenge (Throwback Thursday to CauseScience challenges). What ever happened to the hundreds of millions raised for ALS awareness and research?? CNN.com reports this week on what at least one ALS charity, ALS Association, has done with its millions of dollars.

One summer later, the ALS Association says about 40% of the ice bucket money, $47.1 million, has been spent or budgeted toward specific purposes. In time, it says the plan is to pour all $115 million back into five main spending buckets.

Bucket #1: $77 million for ‘research’

Bucket #2: $23 million for ‘patient and community services’

Bucket #3: $10 million for ‘public and professional education’

Bucket #4: $3 million for ‘fund-raising’

Bucket #5: $2 million for ‘external processing fees’

Check out the CNN article for more of a description for each spending category, especially the research section! Overall, it is truly amazing how much money was raised, not to mention the awareness of having this tragic disease all over news, media, and social sites!

Check out this ALSA video while you’re at it!

James Watson’s Nobel Prize for DNA structure auctioned at Christie’s for $4,100,000!! #science #WompWomp

Posted without comment. Background here. Insight into why Watson chose to sell his Medal here via Vox.

[tweet https://twitter.com/DNALC/status/540581810036809728]

#Ebola Update: With over 6000 deaths, President Obama urges Congress to approve more funding #science

cdcgraph

The CDC (with WHO) has released updated case counts for the Ebola Virus outbreak in West Africa as of December 3, 2014. The total confirmed cases is now over 17,000, with over 6,000 deaths from the disease. cdc123

President Obama has urged the US Congress to pass additional funding to fight the Ebola outbreak:

President Obama on Tuesday hailed U.S. efforts to develop a vaccine for Ebola and pleaded with Congress to pass his $6.2 billion request to combat the virus at home and abroad, warning that while efforts in the West African hot zone have shown progress, the fight is “not even close to being over.”

The United States has designated 35 hospitals across the country as Ebola treatment centers, which will dramatically increase the number of hospital beds available for treating ebola patients.

A potential Ebola case in Boston has initially tested negative for the ebola virus and positive for malaria.

During a Wednesday afternoon press conference, Dr. David Hooper, chief of the MGH Infection Control Unit, said initial tests for Ebola were negative, but did test positive for Malaria. While the patient will be retested over the next few days, the changes of a positive result were low.

Awesome @ACSReactions infographic explains why there is no cure for #Ebola yet – hint – research, money, time

on Imgur here.