Infographic highlights lack of women in #STEM fields @TezaTechCompany #makeachange #WomeninSTEM #science

International Day of the Girl is celebrated in October and celebrates and highlights opportunities for girls across the globe. Over 47% of the workforce is women, and we all need to be celebrated! Women in STEM fields should be particularly celebrated, as they are underrepresented and often face discrimination working in STEM fields. Teza technologies has provided CauseScience with the infographic below to draw attention to women in STEM fields during the month of October, take a look!

Day of Girl

Advertisements

Infographic about @NASA_SLS booster – rocket test tomorrow!!

Tomorrow NASA will run a static test on the new rocket SLS booster. More information on the test and link to live feed here. The test will be at 11:30 a.m. EDT on Wednesday, March 11, at Orbital ATK Propulsion Systems’ test facilities in Promontory, Utah.

6 molecules in the brain for happiness!! Cool infographic!! #science

Check out this cool infographic with some basic neuroscience on happiness!!! Click the pic below to see the full infographic!!

The Science Behind HappinessEverybody wants to be feel and radiate Happiness but did you know that how happy you feel all starts with six tiny molecules found in your brain? From Oxytocin, the love molecule, to Adrenaline, the energy molecule, this infographic breaks down what exactly each of these molecules are and how they affect you and your state of happiness. This helpful infographic from the folks at Jazzercise even includes actions you can take to give certain chemicals a boost. So if you’re low on endorphins, smell some vanilla, throw on some music and exercise, and you should feel those endorphins in no time!

New interactive map shows the germs at your local NYC subway stop! Fun… and scary!! #science

sub

Check out this awesome interactive map of the bacteria in New York City’s subway system (from the Wall Street Journal)!! The map is one of the results of a huge project looking at bacteria and other germs and microbiology in the City’s transit system! Above I took a screenshot of the map for the subway station next to Columbia Presbyterian Hospital at 168th St, including 108 bacteria that can cause all sorts of problems – including antibiotic resistant bacteria! This is a super fun tool…. unless you’re a germaphobe, in which case it is horrifying  :/

Every day, New York City’s 5.5 million commuters seed the city subways with bacteria from the food they eat, the pets or plants they keep, and their shoes, sneezes and unwashed hands.

For the first time, researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College sampled DNA in New York City’s 466 open subway stations. They found genetic material from 15,152 different species, most of them harmless or unidentified. Almost half the DNA belonged to bacteria. No two subway stations were exactly the same, and the research continues.

So far, the scientists have identified 67 bacteria species associated with disease and infections. Here are details on a few of the bacteria found.

Awesome BBC infographic on absolute zero to ‘absolute hot’ – and a lot of stuff in between. @BBC_Future

Check out this awesome temperature infographic from BBC!!

A billion degrees of separation.

How cold can it get on Earth? How hot can hot truly get? And, perhaps more importantly, what’s the ideal temperature a hazelnut souffle should be cooked at?

New video/GIF visualizes waves in Earth’s Ionosphere, 70 miles up!! #supercomputer

g7bx5

Check out this awesome GIF (credit: CauseScience) of Wired.com’s Science Graphic of the Week. The GIF is of a video published in Geophysical Research Letters and shows 3 days of ‘weather’ in the E-layer of the ionosphere, 70 miles up. Check out the Wired.com post for more info here. The video is posted to youtube here, and shows ionospheric gravity waves simulated using NCAR’s Wyoming Super-Computer.

When the Earth’s surface roils with stormy weather, it causes the upper atmosphere to ripple like a breezy pond. Scientists only recently connected the two systems, and a new supercomputer-powered simulation broadens their understanding of how thunderstorms, jet streams, and cyclones affect weather at the edge of space.