Amazing footage of glacier snapping off and falling into the ocean #ClimateChange

Photographer James Balong and his crew were in Greenland catching footage for a time-lapse around the Arctic Circle when they caught this amazing footage of a huge chunk of glacier (the size of lower Manhattan) snapping off and falling into the ocean. The film is amazing, alarming, and sad. Climate Change is real, y’all.

If you were moved even a fraction as much as those glaciers moved, you can sign this petition to demand that we protect the Arctic Circle now before it gets worse.

A climate triptych: This is what the melting arctic ice cap looks like!! @wiredscience

Nick Stockton at Wired.com has put together a compilation of 3 different ways to visualize the melting arctic ice cap. Above is one example:

The gallery of strange figures you see above represents the outlines of Arctic sea ice extent month by month from 1979 to the present.

… generated from National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) north pole sea ice extent. The images are arranged in a grid with the years across the top from 1979 to 2014 and the months running down the image from January to December. Click image for full resolution. NASA’s Scientific Visualization Studio

Check out Stockton’s article for other awesome animations of the melting ice cap.

A climate triptych: This is what the melting arctic ice cap looks like!! @wiredscience

Nick Stockton at Wired.com has put together a compilation of 3 different ways to visualize the melting arctic ice cap. Above is one example:

The gallery of strange figures you see above represents the outlines of Arctic sea ice extent month by month from 1979 to the present.

… generated from National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) north pole sea ice extent. The images are arranged in a grid with the years across the top from 1979 to 2014 and the months running down the image from January to December. Click image for full resolution. NASA’s Scientific Visualization Studio

Check out Stockton’s article for other awesome animations of the melting ice cap.