Anti-Science Quotable: Presidential Candidate Rand Paul rebrands himself as Dr. #science

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In case you missed it, SENATOR Rand Paul announced this week that he will run for President in 2016. In response to his announcement, we thought now would be a good time to revisit some of Rand Paul’s anti-science rantings. Check out the numerous CauseScience “Anti-Science Quotable” posts courtesy of Rand Paul. Also be sure to check out this MaddowBlog post highlighting Rand Paul’s rebranding of himself as a DOCTOR. AND don’t forget to check out Dr. Rand Paul’s medical career section on wikipedia. As pointed out on CauseScience before, it appears that Paul is not a board certified physician, and his most recent boarding was through his own made up medical board not recognized by the American Board of Medical Specialties. YIKES!

The more Paul talks about his medical background, the more we’re reminded that whenever medicine and politics have intersected lately, the GOP lawmaker has gotten himself into trouble with nonsense.
For example, Rand Paul’s deeply ridiculous rhetoric about the Ebola virus looks absurd, if not genuinely dangerous, six months after the public-health scare.
His rhetoric about vaccines was arguably even more bizarre. Remember when he said vaccinations and “profound mental disorders” are “temporally related”?
Paul seems to think medical research at the National Institutes of Health is some kind of punch line, worthy of mockery. He’s also been a longtime member of a medical organization, the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons, which has “expressed doubts about the connection between HIV and AIDS and suggested that President Barack Obama may have been elected because he was able to hypnotize voters.”
Given all of this, does the senator really want to cite his work as a doctor as some kind of presidential qualification?
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New York City doctor with #Ebola is cured and will be released tomorrow!!! #science

This is great news! Dr. Craig Spencer, who was diagnosed with ebola and caused a bit of a FEAR-BOLA scare in NYC, has been successfully treated! This case further supports the science, which says early treatment is crucial… but if initiated can be quite successful.

“Dr. Spencer poses no public health risk and will be discharged from the hospital tomorrow, Tuesday, November 11th,” the city health department said in a statement.

So far there have been no additional ebola cases in NYC following any potential exposure from Dr. Spencer. So glad that this hero who worked in Guinea with Doctors Without Borders is well!!!

Are you a medical resident? Or are you the partner of a medical resident? AMA has some advice #worklifebalance

residencyThe American Medical Association has some advice for medical residents and their partners for successfully navigating the years of hell that = residency (Not really looking forward to it in a year). Check out their post, and their link to the 6 additional tips in an article in Physician Family!

  1. Find support. Residents work long hours and are stressed and tired. These pressures can affect everyone in the family, so it’s important to have a support network, such as the AMA Alliance.

  2. Share calendars. A resident’s schedule is unpredictable, so keep a calendar handy that includes the schedules of every member of the household. This practice can help make planning easier and  encourage communication.

  3. Schedule alone time. Spouses and significant others of residents get stressed, too. Setting aside time to reflect and rejuvenate can be very beneficial.

  4. Be flexible. Taking care of sick and injured patients is inherently unpredictable. Always have a back-up plan.