Carbon dioxide levels continue to set records – up 3.05 ppm in 2015. @NOAA #ActOnClimate

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More bad, and yet unsurprising, news from NOAA this week re:climatechange (Image: CO2 computer model adapted from NASA). Levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide are going up and up, and at record breaking levels… womp womp.

The annual growth rate of atmospheric carbon dioxide measured at NOAA’s Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii jumped by 3.05 parts per million during 2015, the largest year-to-year increase in 56 years of research.

In another first, 2015 was the fourth consecutive year that CO2 grew more than 2 ppm, said Pieter Tans, lead scientist of NOAA’s Global Greenhouse Gas Reference Network.

“Carbon dioxide levels are increasing faster than they have in hundreds of thousands of years,” Tans said. “It’s explosive compared to natural processes.”

This news comes after the recent news that 2015 was the warmest year on record and that winter in the US had above average temps. CLIMATE CHANGE IS REAL!! and its going to get worse 😦

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NASA computer model of Earth’s CO2 is awesome! #science

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Check out the awesome NASA computer simulation of the Earth’s Carbon Dioxide over a year.

Scientists have made ground-based measurements of carbon dioxide for decades and in July NASA launched the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) satellite to make global, space-based carbon observations. But the simulation – the product of a new computer model that is among the highest-resolution ever created – is the first to show in such fine detail how carbon dioxide actually moves through the atmosphere.

In the spring of 2014, for the first time in modern history, atmospheric carbon dioxide – the key driver of global warming – exceeded 400 parts per million across most of the northern hemisphere. Prior to the Industrial Revolution, carbon dioxide concentrations were about 270 parts per million. Concentrations of the greenhouse gas in the atmosphere continue to increase, driven primarily by the burning of fossil fuels.

Increasing Carbon Dioxide levels will deplete our food of nutrition

A Nature Letter this week shows that increasing levels of atmospheric CO(a greenhouse gas) will cause a decline in the nutritional value of plants important for feeding the globe. The study looked at C3 and C4 plants, which use different biochemical methods to process carbon from CO2. C3 plants were more sensitive to higher COconcentrations than C4 plants. C3 plants include many common grains and legumes and more than 95 percent of plant species on earth (rice, wheat, oranges, grapes, potatoes…). C4 plants include corn and sugar cane and represent the second most prevalent form of photosynthetic plants. There is actually a push to make genetically modified rice that will be a C4 plant, which would make it more resistant to increasing CO2 levels (C4 rice).

“Dietary deficiencies of zinc and iron are a substantial global public health problem. An estimated two billion people suffer these deficiencies1, causing a loss of 63  million life-years annually23. Most of these people depend on C3 grains and legumes as their primary dietary source of zinc and iron. Here we report that C3 grains and legumes have lower concentrations of zinc and iron when grown under field conditions at the elevated atmospheric COconcentration predicted for the middle of this century. C3 crops other than legumes also have lower concentrations of protein, whereas C4 crops seem to be less affected. Differences between cultivars of a single crop suggest that breeding for decreased sensitivity to atmospheric CO2 concentration could partly address these new challenges to global health.”