Science at the Oscars! #IfScientistsWereLikeStars

YAY Oscars! Last night’s Academy Awards ceremony did not disappoint- political commentary mixed with some humor, beautiful dresses (and people), some maaajor drama, and even some science! Pretty sure there was more mention of science during the Oscar’s than there has been during any of Trumps speeches ever (someone fact check me on that). Here are the highlights:

Hidden Figures nominated for several Oscars: While it didn’t take home any awards, Hidden Figures was nominated for Best Picture, Best Supporting Actress (Octavia Spencer), and Best Writing Adapted Screenplay.This film is the story of a team of African-American women mathematicians who served a vital role in NASA during the early years of the US space program. This is a major shoutout to both women and minorities in science, and it’s always great when a science film makes it to the awards show. Not to mention, our favorite scientist Neil deGrasse Tyson was live tweeting about the film throughout the Oscars.

GE wins “Best Commercial” with it’s ad geared towards hiring more women scientists: YAAAS. This was one of the best commercials I’ve ever seen. Huge kudos to GE for dedicating efforts to hiring more women in STEM and advertising this initiative in a well-done commercial. It’s beautiful.

Shoutout to Science and Tech awards: While they unfortunately have their own separate event, it’s nice that the Oscars took the time to highlight some of the innovation made from the science and technology sectors and their contribution to film making. Some of these awards went to facial-performance-capture technology, animation technology, and improvements in digital camera systems.

 

Celebrating 90 years since Robert Goddard’s rocket launch – @NASA #space

recreated-goddard-launch-1976

NASA is celebrating 90 years since Robert Goddard’s rocket lifted off, launching the era of spaceflight.

Ninety years ago, on March 16, 1926, a rocket lifted off – not with a bang, but with a subtle, quiet flame – and forever changed the scope of scientific exploration. This event ties directly to the birth of NASA more than 30 years later.

None of this would be possible without the experiments of Massachusetts physics professor Robert Goddard, best known for inventing the liquid-fueled rocket. The namesake of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, he dreamed as early as 1909 of creating an interplanetary vehicle. While he couldn’t achieve that in his lifetime, his inventions in the first half of the 20th century became the engineering foundation for the rockets that first took humans to the moon in the 1960s and for today’s rockets, which look further into space than ever before.

 

After nearly 17 years of work, Goddard successfully launched his creation on March 16, 1926.

Highlights from Scott Kelly’s #YearInSpace

https://embed.theguardian.com/embed/video/science/video/2016/mar/02/what-did-scott-kelly-do-in-space-for-a-year-video

From The Guardian: Look back at the highlights of Scott Kelly’s year in space. The US astronaut touched down on Earth after a 340-day mission on board the International Space Station which helped Nasa study the long-term effects of space travel. Kelly kept himself busy doing everything from science experiments to space walks and dressing up as a gorilla. Nasa are also able to compare his condition with that of his identical twin brother Mark on Earth

Shelf Life Episode 5 – How To Time Travel To a Star – @AMNH video

Museum astrophysicists are searching through early photographs of the night sky and, with the help of high school students, helping to digitize them along the way. For more about astronomical instrumentation through the ages, head over to the episode website:http://www.amnh.org/shelf-life/shelf-…