Gender Bias against women of color in science #WeWantEquality

Professor Joan C. Williams and the Center for WorkLife Law released the report, which demonstrates in startling fashion how subtle—and not-so-subtle—bias shapes the daily work lives of women in STEM, and how women’s experience of gender bias is shaped by race. Summarized here.

Double Jeopardy? Gender Bias Against Women of Color in Science was written by Professor Joan C. Williams with coauthors Katherine Phillips of Columbia and Erika Hall of Emory University.

“This is the first time someone has asked women whether they have encountered in actual workplaces the specific types of gender bias documented in social psychologists’ labs,” said Joan C. Williams, Distinguished Professor of Law at UC Hastings, and Director of the Center for WorkLife Law. “The startling result: 100% of the women interviewed reported gender bias. Also, studies of gender bias generally focus on the experiences of White women, leaving unanswered the major question of whether the same patterns of bias extend to women of color. This report finds that women of color experience pervasive gender bias—but in ways that often differ from the ways White women experience it.”

Significant findings of the report include:

  1. 100% of the women interviewed reported gender bias.
  2. Black women are more likely (77%) than other women (66%) to report having to prove themselves over and over again.
  3. The stereotype that Asians are good at science appears to help Asian-American women with students—but not with colleagues.
  4. Asian-Americans reported both more pressure than other groups of women to adhere to traditionally feminine roles and more pushback if they don’t.
  5. Latinas who behave assertively risk being seen as “angry” or “too emotional,” even when they report they weren’t angry; they just weren’t deferential.
  6. Latinas report being pressured by colleagues to do admin support work for their male colleagues, such as organizing meetings and filling out forms.
  7. Both Latinas and Black women report regularly being mistaken as janitors.

The implication: women leave STEM in response to pervasive and persistent gender bias.

To download the complete report, Double Jeopardy? Gender Bias Against Women of Color in Science, please click here.

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One thought on “Gender Bias against women of color in science #WeWantEquality

  1. Pingback: Barriers For Women Today May Be Less Visible, But Not Less Real | CauseScience

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